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Josh Lefkowitz
Chief Executive Officer
Josh Lefkowitz executes the company’s strategic vision to empower organizations with Business Risk Intelligence (BRI). He has worked extensively with authorities to track and analyze terrorist groups. Mr. Lefkowitz also served as a consultant to the FBI’s senior management team and worked for a top tier, global investment bank. Mr. Lefkowitz holds an MBA from Harvard University and a BA from Williams College.
Evan Kohlmann
Chief Innovation Officer
Evan Kohlmann focuses on product innovation at Flashpoint where he leverages fifteen years’ experience tracking Al-Qaida, ISIS, and other terrorist groups. He has consulted for the US Department of Defense, the US Department of Justice, the Australian Federal Police, and Scotland Yard’s Counter Terrorism Command, among others. Mr. Kohlmann holds a JD from the Univ. of Pennsylvania Law School and a BSFS in International Politics from the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown Univ.
Josh Devon
Chief Operating Officer / VP Product
Josh Devon focuses on product vision and strategy at Flashpoint while ensuring the company’s departments function synergistically during its rapid growth. He also works to ensure that customers receive best in class products, services, and support. Previously, Mr. Devon co-founded the SITE Intelligence Group where he served as Assistant Director. He holds an MA from SAIS at Johns Hopkins Univ. At the Univ. of Pennsylvania, he received a BS in Economics from the Wharton School and a BA in English from the College of Arts and Sciences.
Jennifer Leggio
Chief Marketing Officer / VP Operations
Jennifer Leggio is responsible for Flashpoint’s marketing, customer acquisition, and operations. Ms. Leggio has more than 20 years of experience driving marketing, communications and go-to-market strategies in the cybersecurity industry. She’s previously held senior leadership roles at Digital Shadows, Cisco, Sourcefire, and Fortinet. She’s been a contributor to Forbes and ZDNet, and has spoken on the importance of coordinated disclosure at DEF CON and Hack in the Box, and on threat actor “publicity” trends at RSA Conference, Gartner Security Summit, and SXSW Interactive.
Chris Camacho
Chief Strategy Officer
Chris Camacho partners with Flashpoint’s executive team to develop, communicate, and execute strategic initiatives pertaining to Business Risk Intelligence (BRI). With over 15 years of cybersecurity leadership experience, he has spearheaded initiatives across Operational Strategy, Incident Response, Threat Management, and Security Operations to ensure cyber risk postures align with business goals. Most recently as a Senior Vice President of Information Security at Bank of America, Mr. Camacho was responsible for overseeing the Threat Management Program. An entrepreneur, Mr. Camacho also serves as CEO for NinjaJobs: a career-matching community for elite cybersecurity talent. He has a BS in Decision Sciences & Management of Information Systems from George Mason University.
Lisa Iadanza
Chief People Officer
Lisa M. Iadanza leads all functional areas of People Operations at Flashpoint, including human resources, talent acquisition & management, employee engagement, and developing high performance teams. In addition to collaborating with the executive team to drive strategic growth, she plays an integral role in fostering Flashpoint’s culture and mission. Driven by her passions for mentorship, employee advocacy, and talent development, Ms. Iadanza has more than twenty years of experience in building, scaling, and leading human resources functions. Prior to Flashpoint, she held leadership roles at Conde Nast, Terra Technology, and FreeWheel. She is a member of the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM) and holds a bachelor’s degree in management with concentrations in human resources and marketing from State University of New York at Binghamton.
Lance James
Chief Scientist / VP Engineering
Lance James is responsible for leading Flashpoint’s technology development. Prior to joining Flashpoint in 2015, he was the Head of Cyber Intelligence at Deloitte & Touche LLP. Mr. James has been an active member of the security community for over 20 years and enjoys working creatively together with technology teams to design and develop impactful solutions that disrupt online threats.
Brian Costello
SVP Global Sales and Solution Architecture
Brian Costello, a 20-year information technology and security solutions veteran, is responsible for leading the Global Sales, Solution Architecture, and Professional Services teams at Flashpoint. Throughout his career, Brian has successfully built security and cloud teams that have provided customers with innovative technology solutions, exceeded targets and consistently grown business year over year. Prior to Flashpoint, Brian led a global security and cloud vertical practice for Verizon. Brian also held senior leadership roles at Invincea, Risk Analytics and Cybertrust. Brian received his B.A. from George Mason University.
Tom Hofmann
VP Intelligence
Tom Hofmann leads the intelligence directorate that is responsible for the collection, analysis, production, and dissemination of Deep and Dark Web data. He works closely with clients to prioritize their intelligence requirements and ensures internal Flashpoint operations are aligned to those needs. Mr. Hofmann has been at the forefront of cyber intelligence operations in the commercial, government, and military sectors, and is renowned for his ability to drive effective intelligence operations to support offensive and defensive network operations.
Jake Wells
VP Customer Success
Jake Wells leads the company’s customer success team, serving as an internal advocate for our government and commercial clients to ensure Flashpoint’s intelligence solutions meet their evolving needs. He leverages a decade of experience running cyber and counterterrorism investigations, most recently with the NYPD Intelligence Bureau, to maximize the value customers generate from our products and services. Mr. Wells holds an MA from Columbia University and a BA from Emory University.
Brian Brown
VP Business Development
Brian Brown is responsible for the overall direction of strategic sales and development supporting Flashpoint’s largest clients. In his role, Mr. Brown focuses on designing and executing growth-oriented sales penetration strategies across multiple vertical markets, including both Government and Commercial, supporting Flashpoint’s Sales and Business Development Teams. An experienced entrepreneur, Mr. Brown also serves as CSO for NinjaJobs, a private community created to match elite cybersecurity talent with top tier global jobs and also advise growth-stage cybersecurity companies.

Insider Threat: Focusing From The Inside Out

Blog
February 20, 2018

Many companies tend to concentrate their security resources on preventing external threats from penetrating their business and compromising assets. While threats posed by outsiders such as cybercriminals, hacktivists, state-sponsored actors, and terrorists are often perceived as the most urgent and critical, insider threats can be equally—if not more—damaging. This is why the most effective security programs not only acknowledge the legitimacy of the insider threat, they strive to proactively combat it as part of a broader risk management strategy.

What is Insider Threat?

According to US-CERT, an insider threat occurs when a current or former employee, contractor, or other business partner with authorized access to an organization’s network, systems, or data misuses it to negatively affect the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of the organization’s information or systems. These situations often entail the compromise or misuse of login credentials and-or the theft of intellectual or financial assets—all of which can lead to substantial ramifications for the company.

Despite the potential severity of the insider threat, many businesses operate under the common misconception that their employees are trustworthy and would never abuse their access. This mindset also ignores the unintentional insider threat where an accidental misuse of systems poses a similar risk.  For instance, if an employee’s computer becomes infected with malware following a spear-phishing attack or social engineering scam, the infection could compromise sensitive data to which the employee has access. This doesn’t mean that businesses should not trust their employees, but it does mean that password hygiene, user-access controls, bring-your-own-device, and acceptable-use policies should be stringent, continually enforced, and frequently updated as necessary across the company.

Insider Threat Programs and User Behavior

With an insider threat program, businesses can analyze a pattern of user behavior to proactively gauge if, when, and how the user’s actions could compromise business interests. Consequently, businesses without sufficient visibility into these behavior patterns may overlook small-yet-significant events that can indicate the early stages of an insider threat. For example, when a visit to a suspicious website or an email exposing sensitive data are viewed as innocent mistakes rather than potential indicators of an insider threat, companies may not address these behaviors appropriately. Insider threat programs are designed to identify and evaluate these issues and the extent to which they align with a user’s normal behavior patterns. This process can help businesses effectively identify and mitigate potential insider threats proactively.

Functional and Organizational Maturity

Before a company can build out its Insider threat capabilities, it must assess its functional and organizational maturity. Organizational maturity refers to the company’s ability to leverage threat intelligence based on its people and structure. Functional maturity refers to how well the company has implemented and executed on the goals of its security program.

Assessing a company’s organizational maturity starts with understanding the way its security programs protect its assets. The goal for most companies is for their security programs to transition to a more proactive approach where they are leveraging intelligence to anticipate potential threats and address overall business risk proactively. This entails using contextual intelligence to uncover emerging threats, learning how these threats operate, and determining the extent to which these threats could potentially impact the business.

After evaluating and benchmarking its organizational maturity, a company should assess its functional maturity to determine how well its teams are able to accomplish the objectives of its security program. Are teams responding to incidents as they appear, or are they investigating potential problems and proactively adjusting processes to mitigate risk? Companies also need to understand how they are leveraging intelligence and the sustainability and repeatability of existing processes.

Many companies don’t have the resources to create a robust insider threat program capable of anticipating threats preemptively, but assessing functional and organizational maturity can provide insight into whether a company is ready to take on these advanced goals.

The Best Place To Start

For companies that have yet to implement or fully develop an insider threat program, there are still basic steps that can help mitigate the risk. In particular, adjusting the employee off-boarding process can help companies become substantially less susceptible to insider threat. This process could include simple yet effective actions such as ensuring exiting employee accounts are closed, access privileges revoked, and login credentials invalidated in a timely manner. After all, if a former employee maintains valid access to company assets, any misuse would not trigger alerts. Given that many insider threat incidents have been linked to former employees, proper off-boarding can significantly lower these risks.

Another effective mitigation strategy is for companies to audit identity and access management (IAM) systems that manage users’ access to sensitive systems and information. Two common practices for organizations are an annual recertification process and a management approval process for employees receiving new entitlements. Incorporating layers of security into the protocol for granting access to users is fundamental in the defense against insider threat. Auditing this process often to ensure that all users have the appropriate amount of access and there is no potential misuse of privileges is key to mitigating the risks posed by insider threat.

More information on insider threat is available in the webinar, “Insider Threat: Focusing From The Inside Out,” which was recorded on January 24, 2018. Download it here.

This blog post was written in collaboration with Flashpoint Global Channel Partner ThreatQuotient

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Flashpoint Analyst Team

The Flashpoint analyst team is composed of subject-matter experts with tradecraft skills honed through years of operating in the most austere online environments, training in elite government and corporate environments, and building and leading intelligence programs across all sectors. Our team covers more than 20 languages including Arabic, Mandarin, Farsi, Turkish, Kazakh, Spanish, French, German, Russian, Ukrainian, Italian, and Portuguese.

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