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Josh Lefkowitz
Chief Executive Officer
Josh Lefkowitz executes the company’s strategic vision to empower organizations with Business Risk Intelligence (BRI). He has worked extensively with authorities to track and analyze terrorist groups. Mr. Lefkowitz also served as a consultant to the FBI’s senior management team and worked for a top tier, global investment bank. Mr. Lefkowitz holds an MBA from Harvard University and a BA from Williams College.
Evan Kohlmann
Chief Innovation Officer
Evan Kohlmann focuses on product innovation at Flashpoint where he leverages fifteen years’ experience tracking Al-Qaida, ISIS, and other terrorist groups. He has consulted for the US Department of Defense, the US Department of Justice, the Australian Federal Police, and Scotland Yard’s Counter Terrorism Command, among others. Mr. Kohlmann holds a JD from the Univ. of Pennsylvania Law School and a BSFS in International Politics from the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown Univ.
Josh Devon
Chief Operating Officer / VP Product
Josh Devon focuses on product vision and strategy at Flashpoint while ensuring the company’s departments function synergistically during its rapid growth. He also works to ensure that customers receive best in class products, services, and support. Previously, Mr. Devon co-founded the SITE Intelligence Group where he served as Assistant Director. He holds an MA from SAIS at Johns Hopkins Univ. At the Univ. of Pennsylvania, he received a BS in Economics from the Wharton School and a BA in English from the College of Arts and Sciences.
Jennifer Leggio
Chief Marketing Officer / VP Operations
Jennifer Leggio is responsible for Flashpoint’s marketing, customer acquisition, and operations. Ms. Leggio has more than 20 years of experience driving marketing, communications and go-to-market strategies in the cybersecurity industry. She’s previously held senior leadership roles at Digital Shadows, Cisco, Sourcefire, and Fortinet. She’s been a contributor to Forbes and ZDNet, and has spoken on the importance of coordinated disclosure at DEF CON and Hack in the Box, and on threat actor “publicity” trends at RSA Conference, Gartner Security Summit, and SXSW Interactive.
Chris Camacho
Chief Strategy Officer
Chris Camacho partners with Flashpoint’s executive team to develop, communicate, and execute strategic initiatives pertaining to Business Risk Intelligence (BRI). With over 15 years of cybersecurity leadership experience, he has spearheaded initiatives across Operational Strategy, Incident Response, Threat Management, and Security Operations to ensure cyber risk postures align with business goals. Most recently as a Senior Vice President of Information Security at Bank of America, Mr. Camacho was responsible for overseeing the Threat Management Program. An entrepreneur, Mr. Camacho also serves as CEO for NinjaJobs: a career-matching community for elite cybersecurity talent. He has a BS in Decision Sciences & Management of Information Systems from George Mason University.
Lisa Iadanza
Chief People Officer
Lisa M. Iadanza leads all functional areas of People Operations at Flashpoint, including human resources, talent acquisition & management, employee engagement, and developing high performance teams. In addition to collaborating with the executive team to drive strategic growth, she plays an integral role in fostering Flashpoint’s culture and mission. Driven by her passions for mentorship, employee advocacy, and talent development, Ms. Iadanza has more than twenty years of experience in building, scaling, and leading human resources functions. Prior to Flashpoint, she held leadership roles at Conde Nast, Terra Technology, and FreeWheel. She is a member of the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM) and holds a bachelor’s degree in management with concentrations in human resources and marketing from State University of New York at Binghamton.
Lance James
Chief Scientist / VP Engineering
Lance James is responsible for leading Flashpoint’s technology development. Prior to joining Flashpoint in 2015, he was the Head of Cyber Intelligence at Deloitte & Touche LLP. Mr. James has been an active member of the security community for over 20 years and enjoys working creatively together with technology teams to design and develop impactful solutions that disrupt online threats.
Brian Costello
SVP Global Sales and Solution Architecture
Brian Costello, a 20-year information technology and security solutions veteran, is responsible for leading the Global Sales, Solution Architecture, and Professional Services teams at Flashpoint. Throughout his career, Brian has successfully built security and cloud teams that have provided customers with innovative technology solutions, exceeded targets and consistently grown business year over year. Prior to Flashpoint, Brian led a global security and cloud vertical practice for Verizon. Brian also held senior leadership roles at Invincea, Risk Analytics and Cybertrust. Brian received his B.A. from George Mason University.
Tom Hofmann
VP Intelligence
Tom Hofmann leads the intelligence directorate that is responsible for the collection, analysis, production, and dissemination of Deep and Dark Web data. He works closely with clients to prioritize their intelligence requirements and ensures internal Flashpoint operations are aligned to those needs. Mr. Hofmann has been at the forefront of cyber intelligence operations in the commercial, government, and military sectors, and is renowned for his ability to drive effective intelligence operations to support offensive and defensive network operations.
Jake Wells
VP Customer Success
Jake Wells leads the company’s customer success team, serving as an internal advocate for our government and commercial clients to ensure Flashpoint’s intelligence solutions meet their evolving needs. He leverages a decade of experience running cyber and counterterrorism investigations, most recently with the NYPD Intelligence Bureau, to maximize the value customers generate from our products and services. Mr. Wells holds an MA from Columbia University and a BA from Emory University.
Brian Brown
VP Business Development
Brian Brown is responsible for the overall direction of strategic sales and development supporting Flashpoint’s largest clients. In his role, Mr. Brown focuses on designing and executing growth-oriented sales penetration strategies across multiple vertical markets, including both Government and Commercial, supporting Flashpoint’s Sales and Business Development Teams. An experienced entrepreneur, Mr. Brown also serves as CSO for NinjaJobs, a private community created to match elite cybersecurity talent with top tier global jobs and also advise growth-stage cybersecurity companies.
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Inside a Twitter ‘Pornbot’ Campaign

Blog
February 12, 2018

Flashpoint analysts recently investigated the trend of adult entertainment-themed Twitter bots known as pornbots, which post tweets with hashtags containing popular brand names alongside random, unrelated terms. The observed set of pornbots appears to be a mix of compromised accounts and accounts specifically created to advertise pornography. As such, organizations mentioned in these bots’ pornographic advertising campaigns on Twitter may suffer reputational damage in addition to distorted social media engagement campaign metrics.

Image 1: Sample of tweets containing brand hashtags and random terms. Brand names have been sanitized
Image 1: Sample of tweets containing brand hashtags and random terms. Brand names have been sanitized.

In recent years, Twitter has become a primary form of external, two-way communication and engagement for organizations across all sectors. For example, companies often use hashtags to monitor the spread and reception of marketing campaigns and sponsored events. More crucially, emergency services may use hashtag tracking to gain real-time insight into current situations during natural disasters and other crises. In a worst-case scenario, pornbots or other spambots could identify a trending hashtag and distort the conversation by sharing unrelated or false information.

Image 2: Three sample pornbot Twitter accounts using the same profile picture. Each pornbot has a different username, bio, and join date, and each bio contains a link to a different adult entertainment website. However, these adult entertainment websites were hosted on common servers.
Image 2: Three sample pornbot Twitter accounts using the same profile picture. Each pornbot has a different username, bio, and join date, and each bio contains a link to a different adult entertainment website. However, these adult entertainment websites were hosted on common servers.

Flashpoint analysts identified three distinct sets of pornbots using identical hashtags, indicating they were likely part of the same organized campaign. While similar in appearance and often using a common set of profile pictures across the groups, each promoted a different adult website. However, the three adult websites linked to the sample profiles shown above were hosted on one of two common servers, which may indicate the pornbots share a common origin. Flashpoint analysts did not detect any malicious files on the servers hosting the websites advertised by the pornbots.

Advertising Methods

Flashpoint analysts observed two primary methods of advertising across the pornbot accounts:

• Hashtagged tweets: The first advertising method utilized hashtags followed by random risqué buzzwords and a link to an adult dating or video website, often featuring online “cam girls” or escort services.

• Link in bio and pinned tweet: The second advertising method includes multiple accounts sharing similar bios and pinned tweets, which contain links to adult content sites.

Image 3: Example of the first method of advertising adult entertainment sites, whereby links are included within hashtagged tweets.
Image 3: Example of the first method of advertising adult entertainment sites, whereby links are included within hashtagged tweets.
 Image 4: Example of a pornbot account using the second advertising method, whereby links to adult websites are included in the bio and the pinned tweet.
Image 4: Example of a pornbot account using the second advertising method, whereby links to adult websites are included in the bio and the pinned tweet.

Identifying Pornbots

Image 5: Sample guide to identifying pornbots and spambots.
Image 5: Sample guide to identifying pornbots and spambots.

Over the course of their investigation, Flashpoint analysts noted several common traits that can be used to identify pornbots and other spambots:

• Reused profile images: The profile pictures used by the observed pornbots were all obtained from public profiles on open-source websites, primarily Instagram and Pinterest. Reverse searches using Google Images indicated these stolen images were resused by multiple pornbots.

• Systematic coordination: Related sets of pornbots systematically coordinated their tweets. One pornbot would post a tweet containing a hashtag, and other pornbots within its group would subsequently post tweets containing the same hashtag, followed by random and unrelated terms. 

• Many tweets, but few followers: Each of the observed pornbots posted tweets at a rapid cadence, with some posting more than 50 times per day. Most of the observed pornbot accounts boasted more than 10,000 tweets, but typically had fewer than 200 followers. Similarly, most of the pornbots were following fewer than 200 other users. 

Image 6: Example of a reverse Google Images search revealing use of a single profile image across multiple pornbot accounts.
Image 6: Example of a reverse Google Images search revealing use of a single profile image across multiple pornbot accounts.
Image 7: Example of systemically coordinated tweeting among pornbots.
Image 7: Example of systemically coordinated tweeting among pornbots.

Pornbot Mitigation Best Practices

The following mitigation measures may help reduce the number of pornbots and spambots using brand names. These steps may also reduce the number of false detections and aid in validating social media metrics:

• Challenge social media teams to identify and block pornbots and spambots following company social media accounts. This action impacts the bots’ ability to capture and retweet relevant and branded tweets.

• Require social media teams to report these accounts through Twitter’s abuse function.

• Implement response actions to react to large campaigns, such as social media teams and cyber threat teams notifying each other when activity is detected.

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Rob Cook

Analyst

Rob is a dynamic and well-rounded All-Source Intelligence and Physical Security Analyst with 20 years of multi-discipline intelligence experience. His background includes managing and developing personnel security, physical security (certified DoD Physical Security Inspector), and operations security programs for the Department of Defense. Rob’s positions have entailed tactical-level intelligence collection and reporting, providing pattern-of-life analysis and biometric tracking of high-level personalities, as well as strategic-level positions requiring POTUS level assessments on foreign military operations and counterinsurgencies. His work in the private sector focuses on cyber threat actors, such as hacktivist and patriotic hacking collectives. Rob has held Vice President positions within two large financial institutions, where he served as a Senior Analyst on their respective cyber threat intelligence teams.

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